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Oxford and cambridge internet dating

oxford and cambridge internet dating-11

For example, this is the style used in show a predisposition to capitalizing the initials of the expansion for pedagogical emphasis (trying to thrust the reader's attention toward where the letters are coming from), this sometimes conflicts with the convention of such expansions to their standard orthography when editing manuscripts for publication.The justification is that (1) readers are smart enough to figure out where the letters came from, even without their being capitalized for emphasis, and that (2) common nouns do not take capital initials in standard English orthography.

have also had this role – and with a space after full stops (e.g. Such punctuation is diminishing with the belief that the presence of all-capital letters is sufficient to indicate that the word is an abbreviation.and in the small-print newspaper stock listings that got their data from it (e.g., American Telephone and Telegraph Company → AT&T).Some well-known commercial examples dating from the 1890s through 1920s include is a relatively new linguistic phenomenon in most languages, becoming increasingly evident since the mid-20th century.There is only one known pre-twentieth-century [English] word with an acronymic origin and it was in vogue for only a short time in 1886. Business and industry also are prolific coiners of acronyms.The rapid advance of science and technology in recent centuries seems to be an underlying force driving the usage, as new inventions and concepts with multiword names create a demand for shorter, more manageable names.; it's also seen as "Com Cru Des Pac".Having a key at the start or end of the publication obviates skimming over the text searching for an earlier use to find the expansion.

(This is especially important in the print medium, where no search utility is available.) The second reason for the key feature is its pedagogical value in educational works such as textbooks.

As literacy rates rose, and as advances in science and technology brought with them a constant stream of new (and sometimes more complex) terms and concepts, the practice of abbreviating terms became increasingly convenient.

The claims that "forming words from acronyms is a distinctly twentieth- (and now twenty-first-) century phenomenon.

Some publications choose to capitalize only the first letter of acronyms, reserving all-caps styling for initialisms.

Thus the pronounced acronyms "Nato" and "Aids" are mixed-case, but the initialisms "USA" and "FBI" are capital-only.

When a multiple-letter abbreviation is formed from a single word, periods are in general not used, although they may be common in informal usage.